Archive for August, 2012

Mid-Year Color Tweaks

We’ve made two mid-year tweaks to the Speedhound color palate.

NOT ChromeFirst, NOT Chrome replaces TiS Grey.  NOT Chrome is a color that the manufacturer calls “Chrome,” but of course it’s really a super tough powder coat, which is not chrome.  So we call it “NOT Chrome” just to drive the point home.  We finish it off with a clear coat and then the decals.  NOT Chrome is a super-fine silver that shades toward grey, with a lot of gloss.  It’s not sparkly or metal flaky.

 

 


OUR BlueWe also changed OUR Blue, but we’re still calling it by the same name.  OUR Blue remains a rich blue with enough red to shade it toward purple.  But now it’s a metallic that turns light or dark, depending on the angle.  It’s got depth, but it’s not gaudy like a bass boat.  OUR Blue is also clear coated, which is more expensive for us to do, but we don’t charge extra for it.

 

 


The RainbowIn a rough approximation of the rainbow, you can get your Speedhound in Ace Red, TRO Orange, Ray Yellow, Nut Green, OUR Blue, New Black, Ice Cream or NOT Chrome.

See our full color palette here.

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Speedhounds Are Chameleons

The ChameleonMs. Speedhound recently announced that she had offered the use of her bike to a friend who is training for a triathalon.  Ms. Speedhound rides a 54 cm frame, which, it turned out, would be too tall for her friend.  We did have a 51 cm Nut Green ONLY ONE that we had shown at NAHBS 2012 and the MIA Bike Night.  It was set up as a fixed-gear with antique track components, including wooden rims, tubular tires, a one-inch pitch chain and no brakes.  A thing of beauty, worthy of much gazing, but a disaster as a trainer.  So what to do?  Switch it over to a road bike, pronto, ready to ride the next day.

I started at 11:00 a.m., stripping the bike of all the retro parts and removing the track-style dropouts.  The split in the drive-side receiver, which allows the use of a belt, is also a great shortcut for removing a chain.  There’s no need to pop the master link or break the chain with a tool.  The next step was to install the vertical derailleur dropouts.  Now the frame was ready to accept all of the racy bits Susan needed to whip herself into shape for the triathlon.  Other than the seatpost, I would be using new components, so there was some prep time to mount the tires and install the cassette, cut cables and housing, set up the brake levers and wrap the bars.  I took a lunch break (chicken and broccoli) and got back to business.  By 5:00 p.m., the transformation from show bike to go bike was complete, and I went out for a test ride.  The wheels felt fast and the bike had that “riding on rails” all-day stability that we designed into the ONLY ONE.  Ms. Speedhound’s friend is going to love it.

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